trust

  • From sorrow to singing, Psalm 13 reflects our human emotional shifts and points us to stability.

    Psalm 12 expresses how David felt when he had been abandoned by godly friends. In Psalm 13, David is so alone, he feels he has been abandoned by God Himself. This feeling is prompted by the length of his suffering. Perseverance in a long time of difficulty is perhaps the most trying to our minds and hearts.

    David's struggle will feel familiar to many people of God. In a marathon of trust, we often ask similar questions. Is God one who abandons? Through David's wrestling, we will learn that God's character and work confessed in prayer sustains us during long, drawn-out periods of suffering.

  • God, A Helper Against the Treacherous.

    In whatever change we seek, God seeks to change us.

  • How do we deal with the real presence of fear in our lives?

    Should believers still struggle with fear? What purpose does fear play in our life? How should we handle fear when it creeps in? What a relief to know that both David and Paul feared at times, as we see in Romans and Psalms. Part of God's work in our lives is allowing circumstances that cause fear.

  • Five Virtues of a Woman's Faith.

    Aspen, Colorado, has 6000 permanent residents, and 50 of them are billionaires. To some, living in Aspen is the height of material prosperity. However, people of spiritual virtue have different values. Godly moms in particular desire a spiritual home through which they may leave a faith that will remain through generations of their families to come.

  • Prosperity must never devour mission.

    Quick wealth often destroys. We don't have to look hard or far in our culture to find examples of this reality. At the end of his letter, Paul gives Timothy instructions for Christians "who are rich in this present world" (1 Timothy 6:17-19). This passage is widely preached out of context. The main point of these two verses is this: Prosperity should never devour mission. Prosperity should underpin mission.

  • How should a Christian personally respond to evil that touches his or her life?

    Have you been a victim of evildoers? We all have been touched by the presence of evil as the cumulative effect of sin in our culture. The Psalms have much to teach us about how God's people are to respond when they are touched by evil. Our time and culture is not uniquely distressing: God's people in every age have lived with the impact of evil on their lives. Psalm 37 shows David's personal response to encountering evil in his life.