remembering

  • "Greater love has no one than this, that one lay down his life for his friends."

    This passage of Scripture embodies the very heart of Memorial Day. Nationally, we stand in the face of such love this weekend.

    In combat, it is not necessarily the high ideals of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness that motivates a sailor or soldier to things he or she never thought personally possible. Rather, it is the love for the brother or sister in arms next to them in the conflict. Medal of honor recipient Lawrence Chamberlain tried to explain the willingness of men to face bullets in this way: "Simple manhood, force of discipline, pride, love, or the bond of comradeship." This longing for all to get home safely together motivates so powerfully in the heat of the battle! It is this special bond that creates a camaraderie so palatable that it lasts a lifetime and explains unbelievable acts of heroism.

    Jesus Himself cites this axiom in John 15:13, and we do well to honor those who have fallen in the display of such love.

  • God’s Mercy for the New Year. A Look Forward: Celebrating the Church.

    Knowing our history and considering the future both bring us closer to each other and the Lord.

  • God’s Mercy for the New Year.

    A Look Back: God Is Loyal to His People.

  • The Impenetrable Love of God.

    In a time when our news is dominated by natural disasters and tragedies of all kinds, the glorious conclusion of Romans 8 is a comfort to our souls. This passage has been called a Christian hymn of security and assurance by many. Singing God's Word brings assurance and security to our hearts no matter what the circumstances may be.

  • A Righteous Reminder.

    Some may recall a teaching method used to ingrain material in students' heads: Remember, Recite, Remediate. After material is taught, it is repeated until the students can recite it accurately. Romans 1:18-32 is a repetition of the truth about fallen humanity. It was not written primarily to convict sinners, since the letter was written to believers in Rome. It is a reminder of what we were before the Lord saved us.

  • The Necessary Rehearsal to Prepare.

    At the end of his letter to the Romans, Paul names many individuals who were an encouragement to him in the Lord. Paul had not been to visit the churches in Rome, but he knew many believers who had evidently moved there. The list begins with a woman named Phoebe who likely delivered Paul's letter about AD 57 (Romans 16:1-2). Her inclusion, along with Priscilla and her husband Aquila in the next few verses, reminds us that women are very important to the essential ministry of disciple-making in the church.

  • The Importance of Remembering.

    On days of remembrance, the reality is especially poignant that our freedom is never free. In the history of this country, God has not primarily used religious or political leaders to safeguard liberty; He uses the sacrifices of men and women in the armed forces to secure our freedom.

    Spiritual liberty, too, was bought at a high price. Jesus Christ paid his life for our eternal freedom.