Psalms

  • Psalm 84

    Longing for Home.

    Psalm 84 describes a person longing for God's dwelling place and points us toward the home we were created for.

  • Psalm 50

  • Psalm 46

    A Psalm of Trust.

    Comforting verses are often quoted out of context. Think of Philippians 4:13 or Lamentations 3:22-23. The context of these verses does not diminish their impact; it actually enriches our understanding of the comfort they provide. Psalm 46:10 is one of those familiar verses.

  • Psalm 133

    True Unity Comes from God Alone.

    Psalm 133 has a simple structure around the theme of unity. In reality, unity is not as simple as it sounds. Our unity is only as good as our Savior; if we lack unity, it might be because we are not in our Savior.

  • Psalm 53

    Man’s Depravity and God’s Salvation.

    Imagine a doctor who discovers a long-time patient has cancer. She knows the news would make her patient very upset, so she only tells him to keep eating healthy and exercising, and he should be fine. The patient feels relieved when he leaves the office, but how has the doctor served her patient?

    There is a difference between hearing what we want to hear and hearing the truth that we need to hear. Psalm 53 is one place the Bible tells us the difficult truth we need to hear.

  • Psalm 62

    Continue to Trusting God When Oppressed.

    When culture moves away from God’s truth, calling right wrong and wrong right, what happens to the Christian caught in that gap? Our Psalm today tells us that Christians must continue to trust in the sovereignty and goodness of God. Since our God is sovereign and good, all who trust in Him will be rewarded.

  • Psalm 77

    The Christian Prayer of Lament.

    Did you know that one-third of the Psalms are laments? These honest struggles with difficult circumstances were sung by the congregation of Israel in corporate worship. We don't often pray like that today, especially in a corporate setting. What can we learn from these prayers that were inspired and preserved for us in God's Word?

  • Psalm 49

    Nothing we can gain in this world remains for the next, but we have an enduring treasure in our relationship with Jesus Christ.

    We’ve all delighted in new things—new things that ultimately God has gifted to us. But our delight in new things quickly fades. New becomes old. The universal, unescapable truth is that nothing stays new—not things, people, or relationships. Psalm 49 addresses this readily apparent yet rarely apprehended truth.

  • Psalm 22

    Jesus, as the predicted Messiah, fills out infinitely and eternally all human suffering in order to eradicate it!

    At Christmas time, it is fitting to turn our minds to prophetic truths concerning Jesus the Messiah. The books of the prophets are usually the first to come to mind, and the literal fulfillment of the circumstantial facts they predicted hundreds of years prior to Jesus’ coming is nothing short of miraculous. Another prophetic witness is found in the Messianic Psalms. In total, twenty-five different psalms (one out of six) include at least one Messianic prophecy. Messianic psalms are quoted in eleven New Testament books.

    These psalms are prophetic in a special way: in the words and feelings of the Psalmist were found the very words and feelings of the Messiah. (See Hebrews 2:12.) The Psalmist knew that the coming Messiah would “fill out” the emotional and physical suffering he was experiencing by experiencing them in a way he never could. The pain he spoke of figuratively, the Messiah would know literally.

  • Psalm 136

    Giving Thanks.

    When reading Psalm 136, we can quickly tune out the constant refrain of “His love endures forever.” But God never wastes His breath. He repeats things for a reason. He knows that we need constant reminders of his steadfast lovingkindness.

  • Thanksgiving Praise Service

    Pastor Tim Potter led a time of giving thanks and the Lord's Table. Pastor Mark Mavar exhorted us from Psalm 107 and Colossians 3.

  • Psalm 110

    Jesus is David's King.

    It is often observed that rulers' degree of success depends on who they listen to. The people behind the man in an elevated position often matter just as much.

  • Psalm 66

    If God would hear your prayer, then He must hear your praise!

    We are familiar with Psalm 66:18: "If I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear me." We need to understand it in its context. Often, this verse makes us question whether God hears our prayers; however, the following verses show that the psalmist had assurance that God heard his prayer because he was not one who cherished sin in his heart. The main emphasis of this psalm is the need to give praise to God. In fact, 14 different ways to praise God are mentioned in this psalm. We can be assured that if God would hear our prayer, then He must hear our praise.

  • Psalm 32

    The Blessedness of Forgiveness and Trust in God.

    Opinions on finding happiness are not hard to find. In the Bible, true happiness is an effect, not a cause. It is the product of making God-honoring choices in critical areas of life. Psalm 32 shows the watershed which divides true happiness from unhappiness. The transformative nature of God’s forgiveness sets us firmly on the path of true happiness. The psalmist gives us 4 reasons why.

  • Psalm 130

    Surviving and Thriving While Living Out of the Depths.

    The psalmbook of Israel was divided into 5 sections. Book 5 contains many anonymous psalms and some by David. A common theme of these authors is deriving hope from the guaranteed future for the nation of Israel. Their eschatological message is, "it's going to be okay."

  • Psalm 138

    Stability through Thanksgiving.

    David's life was highly dramatic, but he didn't get caught up in it. What gave him balance, stability, and reference for his direction? Psalm 138 shows us 3 components to the "gyroscope" of David's life.

  • Psalm 106

    Stewarding God's Glory.

    The book of Psalms is divided into 5 sections. As the book progresses, the theme shifts from psalms of prayer and supplication to praise and thanksgiving. Psalm 106 falls at the end of the 4th section. It was probably written by an Israelite living in captivity. It rehearses the Jewish nation's pattern of giving up God's glory, seemingly never learning from their history.

  • Psalm 14

    Will Moral Corruption Swallow Us Alive?

    The content of Psalm 14 is repeated three times in the Old and New Testament, once with commentary. (See also Psalm 53, Romans 3, and Romans 1.) How should we respond to increasing moral corruption?

  • Psalm 6

    Psalm 6 meditates on a difficult Christian endeavor: responding while under the disciplinary hand of the Lord. This endeavor is the sole property of people who have been transformed by Jesus into the often-uncomfortable condition of being lifelong learners, lovers, and worshipers. The joy of learning often includes the negative experience of shame, stifling our own pride, and enduring the consequences of our sin.

  • Psalm 119

    You Need to Approach God's Word as Essential to Your Relationship with Him and Relevant to Your Daily Life.

    One thing you can find almost anywhere you go, including in hotel rooms, is a Bible. When a person opens a copy of God's Word, what should they expect? How do you approach the Bible?