Sermons

  • Luke 15:11-32

    The Heavenly Father and the Prodigal Son

    “Dear Heavenly Father” is how we open many prayers, but why do we say that? Why do we call God our Father? Do we understand the implications of that phrase? The parable in Luke 15:11-32 describes a father who illustrates several characteristics of our Heavenly Father.

  • Judges 3

  • Selected New Testament Passages

    The Progress of the Church and our Personal Responsibility.

    Why does the church do what it does? Why do we gather? Why don't we do certain things? We must answer not in terms of resources or building but instead of the mission. We will look at the progress of the church and see the direct connection we have today with the first church commissioned by Jesus Christ.

  • Introduction to Judges

  • John 21:18-25

    Jesus’ Demand for His Disciples (John 21:18-25)

    John ends his gospel by describing the way that Peter will die. His Master uses dialogue to address this topic. There is a problem with Peter that must be addressed, a problem that we all have as believers. Comparing ourselves is a serious problem revealed by Peter’s question, “Lord, what about him?” When we compare ourselves, we take our focus off of who Jesus is.

  • John 21:15-19

    Love for Christ is Usefulness.

    We learn in John 21:15-19 that love for Christ is usefulness. Christ calls Peter to be useful and to give his life.

  • John 21:1-8

    The Resurrection Appearance Teaches that Christ Is Our Provider.

    John 21 records Jesus’s love and care for Peter. Believers often identify with Peter’s frailty of faith. In His appearance to Peter on the shores of Galilee, Jesus teaches Peter that He is the Provider even when a believer fails Him.

  • John 20:11-23

    Lessons from the Resurrection Appearances, Part 2: The Resurrection Transforms Grief to Purpose.

    Little is known about Mary Magdalene whose name bears her origin, a town on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee. John depicts Mary as a woman of strength, faith, and unwavering devotion.

  • Ruth 2

  • John 20:1-10, 30-31

    The Resurrection Appearances of Jesus.

    The resurrection is a necessary belief of the Christian faith. Everything crumbles if the resurrection is not true. There would be no hope. Because of the resurrection, the church rearranged its worship schedule to the first day of the week to weekly remember and encourage one another that Jesus is alive.

  • John 19:28-30

    “It is Finished” – What Jesus Christ Achieves in His Death

    From the outside looking in, Christianity can seem like a weird and even morbid religion. We are fixated on the death of a person who lived thousands of years ago and talk about it in a positive way. In fact, Jesus' death is the worst thing that ever happened and the best thing that has ever happened.

    The reason it’s such a big deal can be summed up by what Jesus himself said just before He died (John 19:30): “It is finished.” In the original Greek, this phrase is just one word. Today, that’s all we’re going to look at, what Jesus meant when He said this.

  • John 18:33-19:22

    The Death of the King

    Each time we read in the gospels, we should be asking ourselves the question, “what does this passage say about Jesus?” Not every passage in the Bible directly relates to Jesus, but the gospel accounts are directly related to Jesus. Though John does not give as much attention to Jesus being king compared to Matthew, he takes time in John 18-19 to lay out the kingship of Jesus.

  • John 18-19

    Four Responses to Truth in the Death of Christ.

    Belief is point of the Gospel of John, as the author says in John 20:31. But a belief is only as valuable as the thing that is believed in. What John wants his readers to believe – what WE are to believe – must be true. John doesn't want his writer to believe in just anything; “these things are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and believing you may have life in His name.” You cannot arrive at that outcome without the truth, and when you read John’s Gospel, you will be confronted with the concept of truth. It permeates the Gospel from beginning to end.

    This week we will look at the death of Christ through the lens of truth, and we’ll look at 4 different responses to truth.

  • Ruth 1

  • John 18:1-11

    Just over a week ago we celebrated “Good Friday.” Since when does the brutal murder of a 33-year-old Jewish man constitute anything “good”? The betrayal and crucifixion of Jesus Christ was not a good thing. It’s the worst crime ever committed in human history. All of us are guilty of that crime, because our sin put Him on the cross. Yet the betrayal and crucifixion of Jesus Christ was necessary to who Jesus is and what He came to do.

  • Resurrection Sunday: 1 Corinthians 15

    The Critical Transforming Nature of the Resurrection

    All Scripture is founded on the truth and reality of the resurrection. God through the Word of God by the Spirit of God desires each of us to be transformed by the truth of the resurrection.

  • John 17:20-26

    The Joy of Discipleship in Unity.

    John 17 contains Jesus’s longest prayer, known as the high priestly prayer, which He prays after the upper room discourse, after telling the disciples to not let their hearts be troubled because He is going away and they cannot come. Jesus prays this prayer with the agony of the cross before Him.

  • Overview of Ruth

    God's desire and longing for His people and the world is redemption. Redemption is a necessity for all humanity (our greatest need), but God is not obligated to offer it. When redemption is made possible, it produces hope in the midst of helplessness.

    Listen to our past sermon series on Ruth from 2017 here.

  • John 17:13-19

    The Joy of Following Jesus

    John 17 contains Jesus’s longest prayer, known as the high priestly prayer, which He prays after the upper room discourse, after telling the disciples to not let their hearts be troubled because He is going away and they cannot come.

    Jesus prays this prayer with the agony of the cross before Him. We are reminded by Jesus that no matter the fearful circumstance, we can always turn to the Father in prayer.

  • Conclusion of Joshua